Purslane

Just a note to start this post.  Although it looks like I re-post something I have posted in the past, like “New Menu at Megg’s,” the blog at times has a mind of it’s own, and somehow chooses a post to just regenerate and send out an email.  It’s as surprising to me as to some of you, and I have yet to have anyone who can explain it to me.  So there you have it, it happens, and I can’t stop it!

Now, I have some things to say about purslane.  I have talked about it in the past, but now it’s become one of our favorite things.  With all our company and the addition of a large dog, the deer have found our yard a less desirable area to graze, so we have lots of purslane.  Sometimes, people buy it and plant it in their yards, just because it’s a great plant for any of our warm growing seasons.  And sometimes it seems to appear out of nowhere, and grows on it’s own.  Once you’ve had it in your yard, most likely it has reseeded everywhere.  Enjoy it, because it looks good, it’s delicious, and it’s one of the most nutritious vegetables you can find.

Purslane

It has the highest amount of omega 3 of any leafy vegetable, and is packed with vitamins and minerals.  Wikipedia has some great information about it, and it’s a quick read, click here.  All parts of the plant are edible.  It can be added to salads, soups, sautéed, or anything you usually do with greens.  We love it sautéed, and it wilts down quite a bit with cooking, just like most greens.  I have enough cooked this week to try it in a frittata, so that’s my next recipe test!

cooked purslane